2019-16-Heart

2019 – 16 – heart

Heart

Hello friend,

“Statins reduce your risk by 50%”

Really? Let’s put to one side the fact that no-one – not a cardiologist, researcher, scientist or candlestick maker – can definitively state what ‘risk’ is; for that they would have to invent a time machine, go forward in time, and ask me if I had any cardiovascular events (CV). Individual risks cannot be anything other than 0% or100%; anything in between is an average based on a variety of indviduals, with a variety of genetics and lifestyles. Therefore, how can a pill half ‘my’ risk of 0% or 100% in half?

Here’s what I know: in the NICE statins patient decision aid (whatever that is), the following figures are quoted based on taking 20mg of atorvastatin every day for 10 years compared with no treatment (NICE November 2014):

. In the 20% starting (high risk of CV events), in those taking no statins, over 10 years, 20% have a CV event (not a heart attack, CV event – this could be anything CV related), but…80% have no CV event.

. In comparison, in those taking statins over 10 years, 13% still have a CV
event, (it is claimed that) 7% of CV events are prevented by the statin (although, you would have to look at individuals – genetics, lifestyle – before making such a big claim), but…80% still have no CV event. In total, that’s now 87% who now have no CV event. It sounds great, doesn’t it?

Think about it in these terms: statins have no benefit on the 80% who were never going to have a CV event and the 13% who were always going to have a CV event; add those 2 figures together and you get 93% of people who are being manipulated into taking a drug that is of no benefit to them. Hardly, a success story…

The figures are even worse for the low risk group: 96% of people have no benefit from this statin.

So where’s the ‘50% reduction of risk’ come into it? If you just apply it to people who had CV events, you get 7 out of 20 events avoided; that’s still only 35% reduction; however, if you apply it to the whole group you drop to a measly 13% (that’s the 13 out of 100 who still had a CV event).

So what’s the cost? For a month’s supply of Atorvastatin (40mg) (source the British Heart Foundation) it comes to £24.64 for 28 tablets (80mgs is £28.21 for 28 tablets); a year’s supply is £320.20 – for one user! I’m in the process of finding out just how many users there are, to work out the wasted 93% of NHS money. NICE actually put it in these terms: those with a 10% 10 year CVD risk, 25 people will need to take a statin (atorvastatin 20 mg) every day for 10 years to prevent 1 cardiovascular event; 24 people will take a statin every day for 10 years for no benefit.

Is this the biggest con Big Pharma have ever perpetrated? If so, the Government, the NHS, cardiologists, doctors and nurses are all, knowingly or unknowingly, colluding in this deceit.

Be happy, be safe.
Graham Coutts, 1st May 2019

Think about it in these terms: statins statins have no benefit on the 80% who were never going to have a CV event and the 13% who were always going to have a CV event; add those 2 figures together and you get 93% of people who are being manipulated into taking a drug that is of no benefit to them. Hardly, a success story…

The figures are even worse for the low risk group: 96% of people have no benefit from this statin.

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